thrifty

Word rationing has reached the newspapers. This article

Banking Regulator Played Advocate Over Enforcer
Agency Let Lenders Grow Out of Control, Then Fail

By Binyamin Appelbaum and Ellen Nakashima
Washington Post Staff Writers
Sunday, November 23, 2008; A01

contains the following two paragraphs about Darryl W. Dochow:

In the late 1980s, Dochow had been the chief career supervisor of the savings-and-loan industry, and federal investigators later concluded he played a key role in the collapse of Charles Keating’s Lincoln Savings and Loan by delaying and impeding proper oversight of that thrift’s operations.

Dochow was shunted aside in the aftermath and sent to the agency’s Seattle office. Several of his former colleagues and superiors say he eventually reestablished himself as a credible regulator and again rose in the organization.

And this article (via), a month later,

Senior Federal Banking Regulator Removed

By Binyamin Appelbaum
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, December 22, 2008; 3:24 PM

includes some familiar information

In the late 1980s, Dochow had been the chief career supervisor of the savings-and-loan industry, and federal investigators later concluded he played a key role in the collapse of Charles Keating’s Lincoln Savings and Loan by delaying and impeding proper oversight of that thrift’s operations.

Dochow was shunted aside in the aftermath and eventually sent to the agency’s Seattle office. Several of his former colleagues and superiors have said that he gradually reestablished himself as a credible regulator and again rose in the organization.

Is this common? The author of the second article was one of the authors of the first, so there doesn’t seem to be anything wrong with the repetition, but it still strikes me as odd. I wouldn’t have noticed it at all had I not previously posted on the first article.

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2 Responses to thrifty

  1. teofilo says:

    I’ve noticed this with some frequency in the New York Times lately. Also noticed: early drafts of articles riddled with typos posted on the website the day before they are scheduled to be published in the print edition.

  2. andrew says:

    Huh. I haven’t been reading the papers that regularly, so I haven’t seen it in many other places. I saw the AP do it with some financial news back in March.

    This is aside from headline recycling, which is harder to avoid and easier to notice.

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